Mystery shopping uncover ‘basic errors’ at post offices

It has been reported that a recent mystery shopping investigation has uncovered some basic post office errors.

One of said errors includes an enquiry made asking for advice on whether to send items via second class.

The investigation found that although 75% of shoppers believed the service to be sufficient at local post offices, there were a number of ‘inconsistencies’ uncovered.

Staff had correctly recommended that an item should be posted second class in 39% of cases, coupled with almost 1 in 10 shoppers being unable to withdraw their desired amount of money.

Following a number of visits, peaking over 450, shoppers had commented that the queue times were ‘broadly good’, those immediately being in 60% of cases.

The report continued to state that in 97% of cases, accessibility was good or had seen an improvement.

Chief executive of Citizens Advice – those whom the report belongs to – Gillian Guy, said, “Local post offices are crucial to consumers and businesses so these changes are absolutely vital. They have the potential to ensure the sustainability of the network and protect its role at the heart of communities.

While the principles behind the reforms are right, out investigation has uncovered some inconsistencies with service delivery that quickly need to be put right. Post Office Ltd should urgently iron out these problems to ensure the new service works effectively for all consumers.

In response, Mark Davies Post Office spokesman said: “Our modernisation programme is delivering longer opening hours, greater accessibility for customers and a branch network sustainable for the future. These mystery shopper visits to a number branches at the start of the year show waiting times coming down, with 60% of customers service instantly in local branches, and the vast majority of mystery shoppers being satisfied with staff knowledge on the scenarios tested, as well as with the overall experience of their visit.

This tallies with our on-going research based on customer experiences which consistently shows over 95% customer satisfaction with the Post Office Local model.

There is always room for improvement and we will consider as a business what further steps we can take to improve service for customers, but the findings of this research, if not the narrative which accompanies it, shows positive steps forward in one of the largest transformation programmes in Europe.

Mystery shopping can be vital for a business to be able to consider their customer service and analyse what should be changed and identify what they are doing right and wrong. Have you had any good or bad experiences at your local Post Office?